Tag Archives: edwardian

As if catching his reflection in the oval mirror…

cabinet-mirror-like

1890’s-1900’s cabinet card. Private Collection.

This one gave me a chuckle. This gentleman looks like a deer in the headlights with his wide eyes. And with him looking partly off-shot, it gives the impression he just  came into view and got caught off guard by his own reflection.

On a side note, yes it’s been a month since I last posted, to the day. I didn’t realize it’s been this long. Like everything else in life there are periods when I actively collect (and feverishly so!) and others when I don’t so much.  However, the drought is soon to pass and I will be responding to emails today. ;)

 


Early Colombia Portrait Company button photograph

chicago-columbia-2

Detail of 1890’s to early 1900’s button portrait. ©bahc/c.ryan

This portrait is a beautiful early example of tin buttons the Chicago based Columbia Portrait Company used to make. The three founders Thomas J. Ogara, Thomas J. Durkin, and C.M. Stumcke incorporated in 1893 and the company was successful for nearly half a century before closing its doors in 1940. The name of the company was inspired by the Chicago’s World Fair of 1893 where they must have made their introduction. They made fine oil reproduction portraits and framed button “bubble” photographs they then began to sell on the road across the country.

So let’s talk about this young gentleman. I believe his portrait is very likely the reproduction of a cabinet card/cdv/tintype. The picture is sharp  and he was dressed to impress. His tie stack is impressive too, is this a large gemstone set with smaller ones? (I’m tempted to say they’re diamonds). The button is a smooth matte; unlike the later celluloid examples I’ve seen which have a plasticity or “bubble” effect to them. This portrait looks more like a tintype. I wonder if the young man was at the fair and had it done then and there.

chicago-columbia

The button portrait is 6 inches in diameter, not counting the brass frame with hook. The logo is at the back center.

When I saw this button portrait I knew I had to have it. I was thrilled to find a tintype-like photograph in this format, with the sitter easily fitting in this collection. It needed quite a bit of cleaning up too. I usually keep originals alone but I’m looking to find out how to renovate the frame and cover a few age stains.


A fashionable Edwardian gentleman

rppc-socks

RPPC. Private collection.

A nice portrait of a gentleman from the 1900’s. He’s wearing a sack jacket with a white waistcoat, completing the put-together look with patterned socks, which stand out in this shot. To the modern eye, the pattern looks like can tabs!

 


A fine Edwardian portrait

RPPC. Private Collection.

RPPC. Private Collection.

I found this handsome teen while going through a pile of pictures and I can’t believe I didn’t post him sooner. So clean-cut, so proper. His folks surely gave their seal of approval. Alas, this boy with his whole future ahead of him is not identified.

That delicate flower patterned white tie he chose to wear that day is lovely.

RPPC: VELOX diamonds.1907-1914.


The 1920s boy with the rouged lips

RPPC. Private Collection.

A 1920s little boy with the rouged lips. RPPC. Private Collection.

“When I grow up, I want to be Rudolph Valentino!” Look at this mini gentleman…What a  cute close-up portrait of this boy, and with the rouged lips. Though I knew the practice was common for mass marketed postcards, mostly of romance couples and actors, this is the first time I see this done to a child on a regular portrait picture. Maybe he did work as a postcard model.

RPPC: AZO 1918-1930


Modeling for the camera

The model pose. RPPC. Private Collection.

The model pose. RPPC. Private Collection.

This RPPC has some silvering to it, but this dandy’s pose and layered look with the dress shirt made it too good to pass.

RPPC: AZO 1904-1918


A Fashionable Edwardian boy

Well dressed Edwardian boy. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

1890s-1900s well dressed Edwardian boy. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

This little boy was extremely well dressed with his wool overcoat and cap with the double-breasted gingham suit. Every single piece of his outfit looks new. With the lack of backdrop and the picture looking so crisp, it feels modern made too.

He’s wearing his gloves instead of holding them. His parents must have loved how this portrait came out. While the photograph was decently preserved, the card itself is less so. It is dark green, clipped at the bottom, and has no photographer info or name.


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