Tag Archives: fashion

The boy with the bowler

tintype-cute-boy-holding-bowler

1/6th plate tintype. 1880s-90s teen with bowler in hand. Private Collection.

A mid-teens sitter with his bowler in hand.

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Tom and George Robinson in straw boaters

Tom & George Robinson. RPPC. Private Collection.

Tom & George Robinson. RPPC. Private Collection.

These two brothers or cousins are IDed on the back. Tom on the left looks neutral enough, but George has this ‘piss off!’ look on his face.

I would love to find more formal portraits from the 1910s with the sitters wearing their straw boater hats but, weirdly enough, I don’t come across many. Here these two match with their hats on with different band designs and colored bowties. Nice shirts too, especially George’s with the pleats. I love the look, but somebody needed to tell him to cool off a bit. :)

RPPC: Artura 1910-1924


Modeling for the camera

The model pose. RPPC. Private Collection.

The model pose. RPPC. Private Collection.

This RPPC has some silvering to it, but this dandy’s pose and layered look with the dress shirt made it too good to pass.

RPPC: AZO 1904-1918


A Fashionable Edwardian boy

Well dressed Edwardian boy. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

1890s-1900s well dressed Edwardian boy. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

This little boy was extremely well dressed with his wool overcoat and cap with the double-breasted gingham suit. Every single piece of his outfit looks new. With the lack of backdrop and the picture looking so crisp, it feels modern made too.

He’s wearing his gloves instead of holding them. His parents must have loved how this portrait came out. While the photograph was decently preserved, the card itself is less so. It is dark green, clipped at the bottom, and has no photographer info or name.


The Good Fellows

RPPC. Private Collection.

The dapper gangster look of the 20s-30s. RPPC. Private Collection.

These four gents are wearing the classic suits and hats made iconic by the bad guys of the era. The gentleman to the front right has the perfect looks and demeanor for the style, doesn’t he? He looks like the leader of the pack, and he stands out wearing a light colored suit against his friends’ darker ones. Interesting detail is no one’s holding a smoke in their hand, but they’re all smiling!

RPPC: I haven’t seen this type before. It has a stamp box with S in each corner.


Alice and friend

1880s teenage girls. Tintype. Private Collection.

1880s young girls. Tintype. Private Collection.

Definitely very off theme! I had to post this tintype I’ve had for some time now. I could not not share it here. I love the striped stockings of the standing girl, they feel right out of a Victorian gothic fairytale. These two’s dresses are amazing and their rosy cheeks complement them. And the way the standing girl placed her hands on the other one’s shoulder. A very lovely duo.


Axel in the Bowler Hat

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Axel F. Hall of Minneapolis. Private Collection.

Handsome Axel F. Hall chose to have one glove on, the other off for the picture. His collar is extremely high. He reminds me of the bowler hatted gentleman often portrayed by the painter Magritte.

Axel was born in 1871 in Sweden. He immigrated to the United States and settled in Minneapolis where he married a Swiss lady named Anna M. Hall who was 12 years his junior. With her he had three children, Fred W. Hall in 1906, Mabel A. Hall in 1909 and Edgar E. Hall in 1910. On the 1910 census Axel was living with his wife, children and a ‘boarder’, Minnie Christen, 15. Minnie was related to his wife (her sister maybe) with both parents born in Switzerland but herself born in Minnesota. At the time Minneapolis’ population was about 23% foreign born.

On the 1940 census, Axel was 70 and still living with his wife. His children had moved out but his mother-in-law lived with them. Anna B. Christen was 13 years his senior.

Axel F. Hall. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

Axel F. Hall. Cabinet card. Private Collection.

Photographer: A. H. Opsahl. Minneapolis. MN.


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